Category Archive: katie wood ray

Showing Not Telling: Demonstrations Matter

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We’ve all likely taught ‘show, don’t tell’ lessons in our narrative units. But showing not telling can have instructional meaning, as well…

Pausing to Reflect: Personal Essays

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My third graders are wrapping up their unit on personal essay. While some have grasped the structure and have articulated reasons and examples to support their argument, others have struggled to understand the concept of an essay. I want to take some time to think about what went right when teaching this unit and where the breakdowns occurred.

It’s Tuesday! Write. Share. Give.

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It’s Tuesday! Write. Share. Give.

Should Educators Be Writers?

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Is it important that teachers who teach writing actually write?

In Thanks: Books That Built a Writing Teacher

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What are the books that have shaped you as a teacher of writing? Reflecting today, in thanks, for the authors and books that have influenced my life as a teacher.

Writing Workshop is Hard Work

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Last Thursday, I endeavored to explain writing workshop to parents in my district at Parent University. As I drove home after the presentation, I felt unsettled, like there had been a gap in what the parents were hoping to learn and what I delivered. What would you be sure to include in a presentation to parents on writing workshop?

Writing in Preschool. Where Does it All Fit?

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“People who are comfortable composing are much more likely to have strong identities as writers than people who don’t.” Katie Wood Ray & Matt Glover

GUEST BLOG POST: Growing as Writers through an Author Study

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Stella Villalba teaches English as a Second Language at Beechwood Elementary in Columbus, Ohio. Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, she started her career in education teaching ESL in Asuncion, Paraguay. Stella also publishes… Continue reading

GUEST BLOG POST: Savor a Book: Reading like a Writer

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Edited by Ruth: Pssst…today is Mary Helen’s birthday! Won’t you join me in leaving comments on her blog post about one of her very favorite books? Mary Helen Gensch is currently a literacy… Continue reading

Mentors

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One of the common threads running through the All-Write Conference was having mentors. I’m wondering who are your favorite mentors to use in your classroom and to use for your own writing. For… Continue reading

Using One Book for Many Purposes

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When I started teaching I owned a handful of picture and chapter books.  I came armed with this handful and my love for Judy Blume.  I knew I liked to write, but really… Continue reading

A New Source for Finding Mentor Texts

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I’m not recommending a children’s book you can use in your classroom today.  Instead, I have something better.  It’s a professional book about children’s books that every writing teacher needs to have improve… Continue reading

Curriculum of Time

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I just finished reading the January 2009 Issue of School Talk, which is focused on nurturing young writers. Katie Wood Ray’s Article “Understanding the Curriculum of Time in the Teaching of Writing” may… Continue reading

Thinking More About Teachers & Notebooks

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I’m sitting in Nashua preparing for tomorrow’s presentation. Part of my preparation means returning to my old binders and files when my thinking changed about the teaching of writing. The shift in my… Continue reading

Inquiry Stance.

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Many of the classrooms I’m working in are launching into a personal narrative study.  I’ve encouraged all of them to approach their study from an inquiry stance.  Meaning, get lots of personal narratives… Continue reading

Choice & Genre Studies

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After I attended the November 17th NCTE Workshop entitled “Where Has All The Real Choice Gone?” my mind started turning. Ruth and I went out for cupcakes and coffee at Buttercup Bake Shop… Continue reading

NCTE National Convention

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After meeting Andi, Angela, Beth, and Molly at the WLU Conference in Louisville last month, I decided to attend the 2007 NCTE Convention in New York City. (Those four ladies will also be… Continue reading