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Three Ways to Exalt Process for Young Writers

My litmus test for the work we do in the classroom pivots on an understanding that collecting one’s own ideas and practicing ways to communicate them will serve students outside classroom walls. And it is with that framing in mind – with children reflecting on their journeys, in carefully selecting the language I use, and in sharing feedback on growth as opposed to the final alone- that I hope to continually communicate the importance of process over product. 

Mining the Moments Between Minilesson and Work Time

In those quick moments between minilesson and work time, as writers are settling in (or not), I pay attention to what is—the current reality. I seek leverage points to both know writers better and to support writers in continuing to grow. Over time, I notice as more and more writers find the processes and strategies that work for them.

Getting to Know the Writers in Your Classroom- Part 1: Academic and Linguistic Domains

Who students are and what their past experiences have been impact them as writers, and those impacts should have implications on instruction. Therefore, it’s worth the time and energy to have systems and structures for learning about students as writers in your classroom.

5 Kinds of Nonfiction: Review + Giveaway

Get ready to add many amazing nonfiction picture books to your TBR list! 5 Kinds of Nonfiction, by Melissa Stewart and Marlene Correia, is THE professional text you need to learn more about the different types of nonfiction and how to enrich your writing lessons through nonfiction mentor texts! Be sure to comment for a chance to win your own copy of 5 Kinds of Nonfiction.

When Writing Feels Right: Exalting Choice and Purpose in Workshop

When writers feel empowered to write for their own personal catharsis, it matters. When writers know they will have the opportunity to strengthen their writing alongside peers, it matters. When writers have greater degrees of choice around topic and genre, it matters. And when, at times, there’s a wider audience for writing, beyond classroom walls or the teacher’s eyes alone, there is often deeper motivation.

Wonder Woman in a Cardigan: The Librarian Who Changed My Life

Lydia M. Sigwarth and her childhood librarian, Deb Stephenson, have created five tips for finding the best ways for libraries and librarians to be a safe haven for disenfranchised children. Check out their tips and then leave a comment on Lydia’s guest blog post for a chance to win a copy of her debut picture book, DEAR LIBRARIAN.