Monthly Archive: November, 2019

Finding Interdisciplinary Opportunities in Writing Workshop

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What happens when the next unit in third grade writing workshop is poetry and the classroom teacher stumbles across an anthology of bilingual poetry? This post describes how a third-grade homeroom teacher and a Spanish teacher collaborated to implement an interdisciplinary, bilingual poetry unit.

Write. Share. Give.

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What is happening in your corner of the world? Share your story.

A Few Reflections and Shares From NCTE 2019

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For the last few days, I have had the privilege of attending the National Council of Teachers of English Convention in Baltimore, Maryland. While there were many colleagues and friends who shared the experience, I know many others couldn’t attend. I’m sure there are others who will share in the upcoming weeks, but for now, in somewhat of a post-convention haze, I’m scrolling through my notes and pulling out some of my favorite quotes and ideas from my experiences.

Turn and Talk

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One of the greatest benefits I have had in my classroom, that encompasses all things literacy, has been the addition of purposeful talk. When it comes to inviting students to think and learn… Continue reading

Using Inquiry to Lift Language Conventions

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As middle school teachers, we know grammar and language conventions have likely been taught to our writers in previous years. But why don’t they stick? Here are a few ideas around teaching grammar and language conventions using an inquiry approach…

Finding Accessible Fonts for Classroom Use

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Fonts that look whimsical and childlike may place a stumbling block in front of students with language-based learning disabilities, such as Dyslexia. Get tips from four industry professionals who will help you find an accessible font without sacrificing personality.

Tuesday SOL!

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What’s new in your November? Share a story, read a story, and join a community.

In Case You Missed It: Reaching Your Writers

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Our hope is that this blog series helps to bridge the divides between how we teach writing and how students learn writing because we all believe not only in the importance of writing, but also that all children can learn to write– and learn to write well– and even like writing!

Communication, Collaboration, and Clarity: Reaching Your Writers

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The more we can communicate, collaborate, and empower the people we work with, both adults and students, so that they know and understand the learning that should be happening in our writing classrooms, the more we will see that learning happen. When we all know what we’re working on and we have the tools and systems to support our pathways, great things happen!

Rituals and Transitions: Reaching Your Writers

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When writing workshop rituals become woven into the daily grooves of the writing community, cohesive safe zones develop. The consistency of rituals in a classroom helps students transition within the workshop environment smoothly… Well-established rituals create the space for students to concern themselves less with movement and more with the work of a writing.

Paper Choices for Opinion and Argument Writing: Reaching Your Writers

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Providing options for paper allows all your students to do the same type of writing (opinion, persuasive, or argument) in many different ways. Differentiating the materials makes it possible for all your students to do the work–without having to resort to a formula or fill-in-the-blank worksheet.

Everyone Gets What They Need: Reaching Your Writers

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How a story about babies and bandages helped kids and families differentiate between equity and equality….and what it looks like for everyone go get what they need during writing workshop.

Re-imagining Classroom Work Spaces: Reaching Your Writers

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We cannot always afford to provide students everything we want to give them, but it’s important to find ways to give all kids what they need. It is possible to create a space with flexible seating options on a limited budget.

Entry Points to Build Independence: Reaching Your Writers

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Where are the places your writers find themselves stuck? Identifying our writers’ sticky spots can help us determine entry points for writers to pull themselves out of being stuck and instead strive!

Write. Share. Give.

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It’s a great day for a slice of life story!

Helping Students Who Don’t Want To Write: Reaching Your Writers

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How do we reach our writers who come to us from traumatic backgrounds? How do we help writers who have painful stories they don’t feel comfortable sharing? How do we help children feel safe to write something when they prefer to sit and write nothing? Please share your ideas and experiences in the comments so we can learn from each other and reach more of our writers.

Why Writing Matters: Reaching Your Writers

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Kids need to know why writing matters. And we need to not only know, but presence that ‘why’, both for our students and for ourselves.

Reaching Your Writers Blog Series

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All week here at Two Writing Teachers we will be sharing how to reach ALL of your writers.

Sitting Side By Side With Standards

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There is power in knowing and understanding standards because within them, we can extract teaching points, learning targets, and even success criteria. In this post, we’ll thing about how we can use the standards so set up anchor charts, as well as learning progressions in order to establish clarity and navigable pathways for writers.

Finding Purpose Before We Write: Making the Most of Planning & Rehearsal

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Writers need a purpose. A foundation.  Yet sometimes we rush kids through the planning and rehearsal phase of writing. What are some ways to support kids in heading into writing grounded in purpose? Read on to learn a few strategies…