Category Archive: revision

Advice for the Perfectionists in Writing Workshop

by

Do you consider yourself to be a perfectionist? Are there students in your classroom who might be described as perfectionists?

Spicing Up Revision

by

During the revision phase of the writing process, I find that many writers will often ‘tinker’ rather than really revise for meaning.  Perhaps you’ve see similar behaviors in your middle school writers? Read on to learn a few tips for spicing up revision!

Reimagine Notebook Entries Using a Mentor Text

by

Using a mentor text can be a little like taking a course from a published writer- we can allow him or her to teach us how to be stronger writers. This can certainly happen with our drafts… but we can also do this work in our notebooks. Oftentimes, doing so can free young writers up to do larger-scale revision. Here’s one way I tried that…

Revising for Meaning

by

At the heart of all great writing is meaning.  Writers select details carefully and deliberately, depending on the message we wish to convey to readers. How can we let meaning guide revision? Read here about a few ways…

An Elaboration Tool for Self-reflection and Revision

by

“Show don’t tell,” we say over and over to students but–it’s harder than it sounds, though, maybe for multiple reasons.

Strengthening Writing Partnerships, Part I

by

A writing partner provides a sounding board and creates a social opportunity for feedback, criticism, and notions of what improvement could look like or sound like. The problem with partnerships, however, is that left to their own devices kids are not very good at being partners. How can we help kids get better? Here are a few strategies…

A Few Ways to Empower Writers Using Mentor Texts

by

It could be said that what sets a writing workshop apart from other approaches to teaching writing is a focus on empowerment. Here are a few ways to empower writers when it comes to mentor texts…

4 Tips for Modeling with Your Own Writing

by

For many of us who work to live as writers and teachers who write, we likely do so in order to appreciate the challenge, the complexity, and the thrill that writing can provide for our lives.  It is living through the process that matters.  But what about turning some of our writing into teaching tools for our writing workshops? Here are four tips…

Five Tips to Building a Rereading Habit

by

Do you make time for your writers to reread? Rereading is one of those pieces of the workshop we might be assuming our writers are doing but direction is needed to really make it a habit. Here are five tips to give rereading a place in your writing workshop this year.

More Than Tinkering: Looking Back and Moving Forward

by

Revision is a process. It is also a frequently misunderstood endeavor. As a teacher, I have often revised my beliefs to re-see my goals and purpose when it comes to teaching my writers the best revision strategies.

Sticky Notes, Arrows, and Margins, Oh My!

by

Sharing strategies to prepare for revision later can set up students for success.

Three Tips to Avoid Overcommitting to First Words: Revision

by

Helping light the way to revision for our writers while honoring those first words.

Mindset Matters

by

Teaching students to have a growth mindset and truly understand what happens as they learn has been a big goal for me this year. Over the winter break, a book re-sparked my thinking and how I needed to more intentionally equate our mindset to our process as writers.

When Revision Doesn’t Work

by

I used to think professional workshops were where you would go to get answers, but now I know that the best ones are where you find more questions.

When to Pop Out of the Notebook

by

As much as I LOVE notebooks, even I have to admit there is a time in every writer’s process when it is time to pop out of the notebook and onto a laptop or lined paper.

Enticing Kids to Revise, Revise, Revise

by

One of the biggest challenges you might face in writing workshop is this: getting kids to see the power and purpose of revision. Here are a few tips for helping kids understand how important and rewarding revision can be, organized by writing process phases.

An Eraser-Free Workshop and the Language We Use for Talking About It

by

When I visit a classroom, one of the first things I often say to kids is, “Today, please don’t erase. I want to see ALL the great work you are doing as a writer. When you erase, your work disappears!” Often, this is what kids are accustomed to and they continue working away. But sometimes, kids stare at me as if I’ve got two heads.

Revision Decisions Blog Tour: A Q&A with Anderson and Dean

by

Revision needs to have a sense that a window of possibility is still open to allow another draft in.

Inquiry-Based Centers in Grades 3-8

by

Inquiry-based centers introduce kids to mentor texts while helping them find their own mentor texts.

Flash-Drafting Leads to Large-Scale Revision

by

Flash-drafting helps get thoughts down on the page quickly so writers are open to large-scale revisions.