Monthly Archive: November, 2014

ICYMI: Work Smarter, Not Harder Blog Series Recap

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In case you missed it, a recap of our Work Smarter, Not Harder Blog Series.

Work Smarter: Using Qualities of Writing to Streamline Assessment and Plan Instruction

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Dana’s Tuesday post  about commenting on student writing resonated strongly with me. I used to be that teacher who would collect students’ work, take it home, and mark it up with each and every… Continue reading

Work Smarter: How To Wrap Up A Unit of Study

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This week my colleagues and I are writing posts that we hope will make your life a little easier. We’re sharing some ways to work smarter, not harder.

Work Smarter: Picture Books That Pack a Punch + Giveaways!

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What picture books pack a punch for you in the workshop? Here are seven titles that are sure to give you bang for your buck.

Work Smarter: Use checklists throughout a unit of study …and beyond

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I’ll begin by being honest – I don’t like checklists. It’s a personal thing.  Checklists make me anxious, they fill me with the fear of impending failure. As soon as I’ve taken the… Continue reading

Work Smarter: Commenting on Student Writing

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Seven tips to streamline the process of commenting on student writing.

Share Your Slice of Life: It’s SOL Tuesday!

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Welcome to November everybody!

Work Smarter: 5 Tips for Checking Writer’s Notebooks Efficiently  

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Grace Chough led a session, “Turning Writer’s Notebooks Into Workbenches, and Using Them to Work Deliberately Towards Big Goals,” at the June 2014 TCRWP Writing Institute.  She shared lots of smart thinking about… Continue reading

Preview: Work Smarter, Not Harder Blog Series

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Welcome to our “Work Smarter, Not Harder” Blog Series.  Contrary to what your students may think, we know you don’t live at school.  If the teaching of writing feels cumbersome to you, then… Continue reading

What’s Your Writing Tic?

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Read about writers’ tics, and share your own.

Using Assessment Tools to Teach Transference

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Valuable lessons can be learned when an assessment tool designed for one genre is used to assess another.