Monthly Archive: April, 2018

Making the Most of May and June: Looking Back and Moving Forward

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By taking some time in May and June to try new writing projects, we can motivate students to stay connected and continue living the writerly life when no one is assigning them to do it. They can write (and read) because it’s part of who they are and how they live each day. Let’s not allow May and June become movie-watching, worksheet-filling, killing-time days. Let’s make each day count and keep our writers enthusiastic about all the possibilities being a writer brings.

Student Self-Reflection: Looking Back and Moving Forward

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Someone once told me (or maybe I read it somewhere) that the best stories are like pearls on a string. Each moment or scene in the story is polished, lovely to read. But… Continue reading

Preview: Looking Back and Moving Forward Blog Series

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Here’s a preview about our upcoming blog series that will help you close-out your writing workshop in meaningful ways.

A Breakthrough In Poetry: How To Bring Playfulness to Every Genre

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Kids are inundated by rules. If the gift of writing is freedom of expression, are we imposing too many “rules” on writers? What if the rules of every genre, like poetry, were limited to just two or three?

Three Ideas for Oral Storytelling in the Classroom

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Some sit at a keyboard and the words just pour out. Others use a pen and paper, working slowly and deliberately. I know one writer who prefers a typewriter to a laptop.

And then there are the storytellers.

Write at the Start: No More Morning Worksheets

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How can we let writing be part of a “soft start” for students instead of making them complete joyless worksheets? How do your students start the day or class period? Please join the conversation!

Slice of Life Tuesday

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It’s Slice of Life Tuesday! Come one, come all, come slice with us…

How Many Stars? Tools for self-assessment and goal-setting

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The more we show learners what the work looks like at different levels and the reasons for that level, the better they are able to self-assess, set goals, and improve.

Introducing a New Co-Author

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There’s a new primary voice on our co-author team!

SOL Tuesday

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It’s Slice of Life Tuesday! We invite you to share a slice of life, share some feedback…

TWT Spring Blogging Break

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Our co-author team is taking a blogging break this week. In the meantime, you may access our archives by doing a keyword or category search.

SOLSC 2018 Prize Winners

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It’s been almost two weeks since the March SOLSC of 2018 and we know you’ve been patiently waiting for the prize winners! We had amazing donors this year and so much support from the slicing community. Thanks to all and of course, good luck!

Off You Go, Find a Just-Right Spot! by @kelsey_corter

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Find out how one teacher’s decision to stop assigning seats led to greater independence, higher engagement, and a stronger writing community in a Kindergarten classroom.

It’s Now or Never to Start Up a Shared Writing Routine

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Hey, pssst… Yeah, you. Have you noticed that it’s already the middle of April? It’s spring. There are only a matter of weeks left in the school year (not that anyone’s counting). And… Continue reading

Super Spellers: Review + Giveaway

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How do you approach teaching writers to spell? Mark Weakland’s book Super Spellers: Seven Steps to Transforming Your Spelling Instruction might have some new insights for you!

SOL Tuesday

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It’s Slice of Life Tuesday! Come share some writing, share some comments!

My Five Favorite Share Sessions by @MermelsteinLeah

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Share sessions in the writing workshop can be downright frustrating!  Whether it’s the same kids sharing day after day or every kid begging to share every day, many teachers have confided in me that share sessions are often the most neglected part of their writing workshop. 

Reflections on the Classroom SOLSC 2018

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The Classroom SOLSC is over for this year…now come the reflections!

Rethinking the “I-Rule”

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Many of us were taught that first person pronouns had no place in academic writing. But is that rule still being followed by professional writers?

No More Cookie-Cutter Teaching

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As educators, we need to take ownership of our teaching.  If you think your tried and true lessons are lackluster, change them.  Start with looking at your students and asking yourself, what do my students need? What are their strengths? Next, look at the VERBS in your standards. Precisely what is it your students need to master in this unit?  Finally, embrace the art of teaching, follow their lead.