Yes &… with Digital Tools We Can

by

As we set off to create writers who write in tandem with the printed world and the digital world there are a few we need to consider.

Slice of Life Tuesday

by

WRITE a slice of life story on your own blog. SHARE a link to your post in the comments section. GIVE comments to at least three other SOL bloggers. If you are a slicer and you… Continue reading

ICYMI: Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool

by

We hope you enjoyed our November Blog Series all about writer’s notebooks. In case you missed it, here is the recap to get you up to speed!

Four Mentor Texts to Nurture the Relationship Between a Writer and a Notebook: Notebooks as a Writers Tool

by

Writers pause to notice the obvious and obscure moments in life. They preserve their memories in their notebooks by jotting words, tucking away photographs, ticket stubs, and other items that have left an… Continue reading

What goes in a Writer’s Notebook? Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool

by

Regardless of genre, we want to inspire students to develop their voices as writers, and then use those voices to entertain, inform, and change the world.

Differentiating the Writer’s Notebook for Every Stage K-8: Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool

by

If you can’t sketch quickly or jot words quickly, or the lines in on the paper feel too small, or you find it difficult to organize your ideas on a blank page, then perhaps there might be other tools that are a better fit for you.

Ways to Organize Writer’s Notebooks: Notebook as a Writer’s Tool

by

There is no one “correct” way to organize writer’s notebooks. So much depends upon the purpose the notebooks serve in your classroom and how students will utilize them during writing time. My goal with this post is to share different possibilities for organizing writer’s notebooks and present you with various options. To section or not to section will depend on how you see writer’s notebooks and the role they play in your workshop.

4 Purposes for a Writer’s Notebook: Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool

by

Understanding the purpose of something can unlock a path forward. This week, the authors of Two Writing Teachers are devoting digital ink to supporting teachers in thinking about the writer’s notebooks as an important writer’s tool. Today, let’s think about the various purposes of a notebook…

The Idea Book: A Tool To Help Kids Live Like Writers

by

It’s never too early to instill writerly habits. A class idea book will inspire kids to collect seeds for writing everywhere they go (and much, much more!).

SOL (and Election) Tuesday

by

Somehow, I’m guessing that this community is not one that needs reminders to vote, but maybe we all need inspiration and energy to encourage everyone around us to get to the polls today.… Continue reading

Six Ways to Keep the Energy of Writer’s Notebooks Alive All Year Long

by

You spent the first couple months of the school year helping students understand their lives are significant, their stories are worth recording, and their notebooks are the place to make all of that happen. What’s next now that it’s November?

Whose Notebook is it Anyway? Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool

by

Encouraging engagement with notebooks means we may need to get out of the way. The notebook should always feel like it belongs to the writer.

Overview: Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool Blog Series

by

Though the topic of this series is notebooks, the spotlight of each of our posts shines on writers. Our goal is to foster the kind of writers who, at any age, habitually collect ideas. Writer’s notebooks can most certainly become a powerful tool for this.

Writing on a Snow Day

by

Matthew Cordell’s new picture book provides inspiration for kids to CHOOSE to write when they’re snowed-in during the winter. Read through my Q&A with Cordell to start thinking about how you could encourage your students to decide to write when they’re homebound this winter.
After you read the Q&A, leave a comment on this blog post for the chance to win a copy of King Alice.

Writing Conferences: What to Do When a Writer Doesn’t Say Much?

by

When conferring with a writer, our big aim is to engage in a meaningful conversation with the student about his or her writing.  An individual writing conference is likely the single most effective way for a teacher to help move a writer forward. But many times, even with our best intentions and attempts at “training” students how to converse during a conference, the student will sometimes say something curt, like, “Good.”  Or, “It’s fine.”  Silence.  That’s it.  That’s all they have to say. What to do?  Fear not!  Conferring Carl suggests six strategies to help teachers address this situation…

A License to Write: Giving Ownership to the Writer

by

I am a writer and a teacher of writing. I have experienced the pivotal role ownership has on my writing and my willingness to write. As teachers of writing, we have the opportunity to give the students in our classrooms the license of ownership over their writing.

SOL Tuesday

by

Our systems face significant shock from August to September. After long days, little sleep, and almost no time to recharge, I told myself, “It’s only temporary. I’ll find balance in October.”  Well, October… Continue reading

The Writing Process for Perfectionists

by

To put it simply, the writing process can be excruciating for our perfectionists. If we aren’t careful, we can unintentionally curb the enthusiasm of a writer who leans toward perfection.

Thoughtful Third Grader: Building Relationships Through Writing

by

Making some time and space in the day to celebrate a student each week has enriched my class as readers, writers, and human beings. How do you use writing to lift up the students in your class? 

How To Send Student Writing Home With Intent

by

The way we send student writing home sends big messages to families and writers.