Author Archive

Day 4 Slice of Life Story Challenge Classroom

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If you’re participating in the CLASSROOM Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you share your writing. Welcome to Day 4 of the 4th Annual Slice of Life Story Challenge Classroom!   Looking… Continue reading

DAY 3 SOLSC CLASSROOM #SOL16

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If you’re participating in the CLASSROOM Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you share your writing.

Day 2 SOLSC Classroom #sol16

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One of the most exciting things about participating in the Slice of Life Story Challenge is the community. Writers of all ages need to feel that connection with other writers.

CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 1 OF 31

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Welcome to Day One of the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge!

Success, Struggles and Strategies~ Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge

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When @cathymere first asked if I planned to participate in the 30 days writing challenge my answer was, “Yes! My class will love the idea of a challenge, and they write every day in our writing workshop, so why not!” After my rather impulsive “Yes” I reflected on the writers in my class and began wonder what this challenge would look like in our classroom.

Helping Parents See Student Writing with a Writer’s Eye

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We come together in the interest of supporting and celebrating the student, it’s important to help parents see the work of their child on a deeper level.

ICYMI: Discovering the Writer’s Life Blog Series Recap

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It’s difficult to consider yourself a writer isn’t it? As I read the post in this series I related to each of my co-author’s posts. Considering yourself a reader seems natural to many of us; but calling yourself a writer is personal and difficult.

So, Why Do I Write? Discovering the Writer’s Life

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When the co-authors of Two Writing Teachers invited me to join the team, I was overwhelmed. When Julie Johnson asked me to co-author an iBook through the Columbus Area Writing Project, I was again submerged in fear. I found myself wondering if these writers had read my writing. I mean, if they had read my ramblings on my personal blog they wouldn’t be inviting me, right?
Do writers ever lose their doubts?

Writing Tweet Roundup

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Check out Deb’s end-of-the-month curated collection of writing Tweets!

Student Writing Reflection

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Young learners are fascinating. One minute they’re focused and willing workers, seconds later they’re playful and silly, but watch them with their parents and they become entirely different little people, and I am reminded of how young they are. It’s for this exact reason I love working with our youngest learners. Their playful, innocent nature alongside the desire to be a “big kid” suits our job perfectly.

Daring To Lift Student Learning- Choice in Writing Tools

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Teaching well demands we stay current and try new ideas. There isn’t any insurance policy that the newest strategy, book, program, or app will work for all or anyone, but we trust our education and experience, and we do what we know to be best for kids. Brené Brown in Daring Greatly says,

Risk aversion kills innovation~ Berné Brown Daring Greatly
So embrace the mess, the awkwardness, and all the uncertainties rattling in your mind and do what you trust to be best for the students in your classroom.

Deb’s One Little Word For 2016

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When I reflect on the flux in my life, I waiver between pure joy of what’s to come and loss of what has been. Moving forward is scary when you have so dearly loved all that has been. Just writing this makes me pause.

Small Writers, Writing Small

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Just a quick glance through the writing in our classroom and you will feel the call for more craft, more voice and more drama in our lessons.

Quiet Writers: What do they really need?

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Hiding in the piles of writing were quiet writers, whose empty folders cried out for help. These writers became my focus for the next two weeks, and this post. Quiet writers cry out for help in all our classrooms. Reading the work of the writers in our room was just the beginning; teaching the writer demands conversation with the writer.

Drilling Down into the Writing

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Of the many ways I gain an understanding of my writers, my favorite and most valuable is gathering up all the writing and diving into reading ALL the students’ work.

Writing Workshop Feels Better with Less

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Our workshop was feeling forced, unnatural, and just rushed! We struggled to fit it all in and share time (the most valued time) was cut short with only 1 or 2 writers sharing each day. Something had to give. Writers weren’t growing, I wasn’t conferring, and it just didn’t feel calm and productive. I reflected on our workshop, the work of the writers, and the choices I was making, but I couldn’t figure out what was making me feel so unsettled.

Immersion and Connections: Diving Into Informational Writing

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This is when I realized all the writing we do shares this goal: making sense of the world and being passionate about learning. We are immersed in writing to make sense of the world and who we are in this big world. We are writing about things we know a lot about; ourselves, our families, our pets, our favorite things, favorite foods, and the list goes on and on. We ARE writing to making sense of who we are while imparting information about ourselves to our community. This sounds a lot like informational writing at it’s most basic level.

Bookends of Writing Workshop

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…in our classroom the tie between the opening and closing of the workshop seems to be the “salt of the workshop.”

Writing about Reading: Considering Perspective Paves the Way for Critical Thinking— Part of #TWTBlog’s Throwback Week

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Growing up the younger sibling of a sister with pervasive disabilities was a crash course in perspective. The lessons I learned from my sister have made me who I am. Lessons packed with… Continue reading

Finding Our Writing Buddies

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Sitting down beside a writer holds so much promise and knowing the interest and hobbies of the writer is as important as understanding the process and voice of the writer.