Category Archive: writing workshop

Providing Ladders of Expectations

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All writers learn from studying each other’s writing.

Make Your Teaching Vivid: Show, Don’t Tell

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You are probably familiar with the writing move SHOW, DON’T TELL. However, do you recognize its potential as a teaching move? Enjoy the start of two journeys with two students who are seeing their potential unfold.

Powerful Punctuation!

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Punctuation is a pesky problem. Third grade students often forget their punctuation, writing an entire story without a single period in sight. As I launched writing workshop this year, I’ve been looking for ways to show my students that punctuation can add voice and meaning to their piece of writing.

An Invitation to Make Writing That Matters

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Teaching writing isn’t easy. We can get lost in all that needs “fixing” in our students’ work, lost in the standards and district curriculum maps, lost in the products we need to hang on a wall for a display. We find our way when our WHY is nearest to our hearts: Why do our students need to write well? How will writing play a role in their lives? How will writing make their lives more meaningful? What matters the most when it comes to teaching young writers?

Blending Instruction: The One Stop Meeting Space

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With the easel at my left (I am right handed), document camera, computer or iPad on my right, and a swivel chair all my tools are at my fingertips! There’s no need to move across the room to see the screen or make an adjustment to my technology.  The students and I have access to everything in one space.   This one-stop meeting space allows the students to maintain focus on the learning and not the tools. 

Offering Choice in the Planning Process

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As in all aspects of writing workshop, students should have choice in their planning process.

Fault Lines in the Constitution: A Review, Five Tips, + Giveaway!

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This new book by Cynthia and Sanford Levinson is a treasure trove of information as well as a handy example of many elements of inspiring nonfiction writing.

Knowing My Writers

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September is a get-to-know-you month. A community-building-ice-breaker-month. September is a settling-in month, a becoming-comfortable month, a building-relationship month. It’s an ask-the-parents-about-their-child month. A stack of papers month. Artwork created month. September is a launching month, a set-the-vision month, a build-enthusiasm for the work ahead month.

September is an exhausting month, but a month that reveals much about the 24 third graders who inhabit room 215 with me this year.

It’s Tuesday! Time to share a slice of life!

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Welcome to our weekly Slice of Life Story Challenge! Write. Share. Give. Please leave the permalink to your own blog post, and comment on at least three other posts. Comments energize writers and keep… Continue reading

A Closer Look: Learning About Our Writers with Formative Assessment

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Sound assessment plays a vital role in showing and in detailing progress students are making toward reasonable goals.

Paper Choices: What’s up with that?

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I’ll be honest, the best thing about the start of the new school year is the school supplies. There’s nothing like the combo-smell of  new backpack, pencils, erasers, and paper. Ah. I think… Continue reading

Past the Flash of Technology

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Technology gives us all choices and decisions to make. Big decisions. How can we welcome technology in our classrooms? Technology can be a new way of doing the same thing. Will we seek apps that allow our students to make choices in creating and sharing with others, or will we seek apps that do the same old thing in a different way?

It’s Tuesday! Join us with a slice of life!

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Welcome to our weekly Slice of Life Story Challenge! Please leave the permalink to your own blog post, and comment on at least three other posts. Comments energize writers and keep our writing community… Continue reading

Three Tips to Avoid Over Committing to First Words: Revision

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Helping light the way to revision for our writers while honoring those first words.

A Change Will Do You Good

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Changing things up can mean extra work and moving away from what you’ve always done. It can also breathe new life into spaces and might move you closer to what you are trying to achieve.

It’s Tuesday! Time to share a slice of life!

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  Welcome to our weekly Slice of Life Story Challenge! At Two Writing Teachers, we believe in the importance of a writing community. Please leave the permalink to your own blog post, and comment on… Continue reading

The Silent Hero: Routines and Procedures

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Procedures allow us to complete our daily tasks without worry of what’s next.  Our minds are free to think about the important parts of our day, the learning.

Teaching Students to Self-Monitor

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Three strategies to use so that students develop their own ability to monitor themselves as writers.

TWT Voxer Book Club 2.0

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At the start of the summer, I read and reviewed Patty McGee’s Feedback That Moves Writers Forward. It’s a book, I believe, that can change my teaching of writing for the better…and maybe yours too. It’s a book I want to dive into more deeply, rereading it and sharing my ideas with other educators in a book club. I know that the beginning of the school year is a challenging time to ask teachers to take on anything additional. But here I am anyway, inviting you to take part in a Voxer book club to discuss Feedback That Moves Writers Forward. So why should you?

SOL Tuesday

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Welcome to our weekly Slice of Life Story Challenge!