How has your instruction been impacted by being a Writer?

WRITE your slice. SHARE your link. GIVE some comments to (at least three) other slicers. If you're leaving your comment early in the day, please consider returning this evening or tomorrow to read some of our evening posters' slices.

WRITE your slice. SHARE your link. GIVE some comments to (at least three) other slicers.
If you’re leaving your comment early in the day, please consider returning this evening or tomorrow to read some of our evening posters’ slices.

Ralph Fletcher recently stated:

It may seem intimidating to think of yourself as a “Writer,” but I say that each one of us can be a writer (small w)—someone who puts words onto the page for a variety of purposes. Students will notice. They’ll appreciate the fact that you’re taking the same risk they are taking.

Each person who participates in the Slice of Life Story Challenge is a Writer.  Perhaps you were a Writer before you started the SOLSC or perhaps the Challenge helped you go from being a writer to being a Writer.  Whatever the case may be, I’m interested in finding out how your teaching has been affected by being a teacher-writer.

I finished drafting my keynote for the Penn State York Summer Institute.  Now I’m revising and I’d like to include more than just my own thoughts about the way being a teacher-writer impacted the way I’ve taught writing.  I’d like to know this:

How your instruction has been impacted by being a Writer?

In addition to the link you leave to your slice of life story today, would you mind sharing your answer to this question?  (I’d like to include some of your testimonials about the power of being a teacher who writes regularly in my keynote.)

Thank you, in advance, for your help!