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Interactive Charts

Taking Kristi Mraz‘s chart-making course at the July Writing Institute was so helpful to me.  Kristi really got me thinking about having a take away item (made with a post-it note) that you can hand to kids if they need a reminder to do something.  In addition, she encouraged the use of illustrations on charts.  Since I always taught upper grade, the idea of putting doodles on my chart seemed so foreign to me.  However, by the end of the time I spent with Kristi, I was convinced that having illustrations on some of my charts could enhance the meaning of them (and therefore help my teaching stick), so it would be worth trying.

Last week, I created a bunch of sample charts for an in-service I’m leading today and tomorrow at a local school.  The in-service I’m leading is not about writing, it’s about launching Interactive Read Aloud.  However, Kristi’s ideas still apply.  So, I gave my sketching (on sticky-notes) a try.  Here are three of the interactive charts I created:

This comes from a book club source I was unable to cite. If you happen to know where the text on this chart was adapted from, please shoot me an e-mail so I can give credit where credit is due. (I found this in my digital files and made it into a chart.)

The sticky notes are visual reminders that can be removed from the chart and handed to a child as a reminder of what they can try/should be doing at a given time.

Like all effective charts, these charts shouldn’t just be posted, as-is, in a classroom.  They need to be created with the children so they are memorable and useful learning tools.

Stacey Shubitz View All

I am a literacy consultant who has spent over a decade working with teachers to improve the teaching of writing in their classrooms. While I work with teachers and students in grade K-6, I'm a former fourth and fifth-grade teacher so I have a passion for working with upper elementary students.

I'm the author of Craft Moves (Stenhouse Publishers, 2016) and the co-author of Jump Into Writing (Zaner-Bloser, 2021), Welcome to Writing Workshop (Stenhouse Publishers, 2019), and Day By Day (Stenhouse, 2010).

4 thoughts on “Interactive Charts Leave a comment

  1. I love sticky notes and so do my 3rd graders. I will be trying this next week. Thanks for sharing.
    In the past I have had my kiddos write 1 thing they learned in class that day and 1 thing that made it a good day. They left them by the door as they left. It was good insight! I did laugh because I had a little boy who wrote 3 days in a row…”I like cake”. 🙂

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  2. Thanks! I love charts and use them lots. I am curious about the use of the sketch diary mentioned on the chart chums blog. Did you get insight on this in your sessions?

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