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An Anchor Chart Mashup

As I settle into my job as instructional coach in a new school district this year, I am still orienting myself to my surroundings.  I believe I have finally located all of the staff bathrooms, and I have found both copy machines.  I have a pretty firm layout of the two-story building and if you came to visit me, I could probably take you on a guided tour without getting us lost.  I have noticed the classrooms are all carpeted (rather than tiled) which makes every room feel like my living room.  I am still acclimating myself to the ever-present technology.  Chromebooks, iPads, and green screens are everywhere.

One thing that hasn’t changed, though, is evidence of good writing instruction.  This has been a constant in every classroom I have had the pleasure of working in this year.  I notice anchor chart after anchor chart highlighting important writing lessons.  Come along as I take you on an anchor chart tour in the classrooms of our school:

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This chart is from a first grade classroom. They are just beginning their information writing unit.
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This may be my favorite chart. Look at all those spelling strategies!
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What I love about this chart is the advice to “write in twin sentences.” This chart is also from a first grade classroom.
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These kids are working to be stronger writers.
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There are several options here for writing a good ending.
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This chart comes from our 1st/2nd grade bilingual classroom. These kids were exploring places to write: the library, in bed, on the carpet, etc.
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I smiled at this chart since it is evidence of modeled writing in the classroom. I love the annotations highlighting important parts of the essay.
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My favorite piece of advice from this first grade chart is to “unfreeze people.” I have to remember that myself when I am writing sometimes.

I hope these charts confirmed some of your current teaching or nudged you to think in new ways.

As I continue to ground myself in my new environment, I am comforted by the old, familiar feel of kids learning how to be writers.

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charts

Dana Murphy View All

Literacy Coach, Reader, Writer

9 thoughts on “An Anchor Chart Mashup Leave a comment

  1. I am so happy you took a walk, found all these GREAT CHARTS and you’re sharing them with us! I have jotted down SEVERAL teaching notes form these charts! It’s always so nice to peek into another classroom see their perspective, opens my mind and refreshes my teaching!

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  2. I love Terrie’s idea about putting anchor charts in SeeSaw! Brilliant! I must try that. This was a fantastic post. The charts are so helpful. Thanks Dana!

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