Search Results for: one little word

How to Use the Word Wall: From a Student Point-of-View

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A short and sweet reminder, from a student point-of-view.

Making Comparisons: A Little Glimpse at Discovering Similes

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This week I’ve been checking and monitoring my students’ work and making plans. I’ve been delving into some fun lessons from, The Big Book of Details by Roz Linder for inspiration and using… Continue reading

Making the Classroom a Place for Everyone

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Establishing expectations, student goals, and classroom norms from the start will help you and the paraprofessional move forward as a team who operates with the best interest of the children first.

In the Classroom We Are All Learners: Reflecting on a Year of Becoming Word Conscious

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Elizabeth Siracusa, a fourth- and fifth-grade looping teacher, reflects on the ways she infused vocabulary instruction into her classroom this year.

A View From The Classroom: Month One.

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October is here! We’ve been in school for just about a month now, and our writing workshop has moved from its early stages of uncertainty and experimentation to let’s-get-down-to-it writing routines…

Phonemic Awareness! Yeah!

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Sometimes colleagues tell me that the feel intimidated or uneasy about setting out to teach phonemic awareness, because it all feels so technical. Even the terminology is tricky: phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, phonics… I like to think of teaching phonemic awareness as being just like kindergarteners themselves–complicated indeed, but also a lot of fun.

Begin the writing workshop year by writing on “Day One”

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This year, I’m reaching back into habits of old and carving out time to write during that first day. Here are some things I will keep in mind…

Because Of a Word

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Kids in grades 3rd – 6th choose One Little Word

Transitional Words and Phrases: Little Words, Big Meaning

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There is something to be said for emphasizing the kinds of words and phrases that may not deliver a whole lot of meaning on their own, but when used within a piece of writing, are meaning powerhouses.

Where Do the Words Go?

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When students first begin writing their stories they are oral and planned drawings. Eventually, however, letters and words begin to emerge on the page. How do we instruct this change? It first begins with… Continue reading

There Are More Ways Than One To Teach A Minilesson

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Last week I wrote a post titled How To Plan A Minilesson From Scratch, and I outlined a very simple way to plan minilessons, based on the work of my wonderful colleagues at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project. Now, I am going to backtrack a bit and revisit just a teensy weensy bit of what I said. I wrote, “Every minilesson can pretty much go the same way.” And this is absolutely true, most of the time. Except for those times when it’s not true.

A Quick Little Conference About Choices

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I pulled a child-sized chair over to Zach and sat down next to him. “How’s it going?” I asked. “Not good,” was his reply. “What seems to be the trouble?” Zach explained that… Continue reading

Words Come Alive

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How do you make words come alive? In third grade we talked about description and details making our words visible to the reader.

Reflections on writing workshop: Sometimes when they say they’re “done” they’re really done

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  copyright: Bill Watterson – Calvin and Hobbes This is pretty much how Josh felt when I pulled my conferring stool up next to his desk yesterday and asked, “So, how’s it going?”… Continue reading

Pens Versus Pencils: Which One is Better for Writing Workshop?

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In my line of work as a staff developer, I often get the question, “Which do you think is better? Pens or pencils?” I have to start by saying that I don’t think… Continue reading

Bad Word Club

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This weekend I learned of a first grade club. “The teachers don’t know about it,” Sam (my first grade son) said, “So keep it quiet.” “What is it?” “It’s the Bad Word Club.… Continue reading

Please share your words today. #slice2013

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Post a link to your slice of life story and/or share the one little word you’ll live by this year.

A Little Writing Love

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As an instructional coach, a key part of my job is to encourage and inspire teachers. This is one of my favorite things about my job. It isn’t easy to be the person… Continue reading

Word Play (a writing night for families)

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Tomorrow night I’ve been invited to talk with parents and host a mini-writing workshop for families. You must know, about a week ago, our youngest, Sam (a first grader), gave two slips of… Continue reading

Another little challenge, of sorts

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During the first week of this year’s month-long SOLSC, I noticed someone posted around 10 or 11 p.m. and remarked that no one ever comments on late-night posters.  My heart sunk.  How frustrating… Continue reading