Author Archive

Day 23 of the March SOLSC #SOL16

by

Welcome to Day 23 of the March Slice of Life Story Challenge. We’re glad you’re with us!

Day 22 of the March SOLSC #SOL16

by

Welcome to Day 22 of the March SOLSC! You’re on the home stretch!

Day 21 of the March SOLSC

by

You made it to Day 21 of #sol16! Hooray!

Day 20 of the March SOLSC #SOL16

by

Welcome to Day 20 of the March Slice of Life Story Challenge# #sol16

Day 19 of the March SOLSC #SOL16

by

Welcome to Day 19! We’re so glad you’re with us!

Day 18 of the March SOLSC #SOL16

by

Welcome to the 18th day of the Slice of Life Story Challenge #sol16

Day 17 of the March SOLSC

by

Welcome to Day 17 of the Slice of Life Story Challenge!

Day 16 of the March SOLSC

by

Welcome to Day 16!

Day 15 of the March SOLSC

by

Congratulations! You made it to Day 15!

Teaching Side-By-Side: Coaching and Classroom Visits

by

This month, interspersed with the Slice of Life Story Challenge, my colleagues and I are writing about professional development possibilities. Many of our readers are literacy coaches, team leaders, administrators, professors, and classroom teachers… Continue reading

And the Winner of the Commenting Challenge is. . .

by

Congratulations to the winner of this weekend’s Commenting Challenge!

Get Ready for a Commenting Challenge!

by

As you know, our community thrives on comments. We share our stories in the hopes we will connect with our readers. In the spirit of that community, we offer the first mid-month challenge of the 9th Annual SOLSC.

Instant Minilesson Follow-Up

by

A strong active engagement, and a routine for informally assessing student work during the minilesson can give you the tools you need to be sure that no student leaves the meeting area completely confused.

“I want to give you a compliment.”

by

The next time you are conferring, try this neat little tip that one of my wonderful colleagues shared with me.

Lessons from Characters Who Are Writers: Discovering the Writer’s Life

by

Kids often feel as though that they are the only ones who have ever been stuck for ideas, or been laughed at, or had a story rejected (by a teacher, or friend). No matter where you live, no matter what you write, there is no need to discover every writing problem all on your own. That’s where characters in books come in. Why not learn from them?

The Schedule: How Do You Fit It All In?

by

In this post, I share several examples of daily schedules, along with links to other resources.

Three Quick Tips for Small Group Strategy Lessons

by

Have you been super busy the past few weeks? I know I sure have been! So, I won’t take up any extra of your time. Here are three quick tips for small group… Continue reading

Sometimes It’s Actually Not a Choice: Accountability in the Writing Workshop

by

My goal for the next few weeks is to pay close attention to kids when they leave the meeting area to start working. How many are actually trying out the new strategy? How many are going right back to their old habits? And what can I do to coach them to try new things?

Looking for March Slice of Life Story Challenge Prize Donations

by

In a few weeks, we will begin our 9th Annual Slice of Life Story Challenge (SOLSC). The rewards for writing for 31 consecutive days are numerous: you will develop a writing habit, sharpen your writing skills, find your voice as a writer, belong to a writing community, receive peer feedback, and learn to savor the struggle of writing.

Beth’s One Little Word for 2016

by

Play is at the top of my list for 2016, and I want to shout it from the rooftops. Pitting play against literacy is a false dichotomy. It’s not either/or. The way to teach literacy is to provide time for kids to play, talk, dance and sing their little hearts out!