Monthly Archive: October, 2019

Three Keys to Writing Partnership Success

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There can be many moving parts in the writing workshop. Partnerships can be a driving force in the growth and goal setting of writers within your classroom. In my experience, there are three areas I work to strengthen within my writers to ensure partnerships foster this growth and development across the year.

National Day On Writing is Almost Here!

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It’s almost time for the National Day On Writing! Read on for some ideas on ways to celebrate with students. How will you celebrate this day?

Living the Writerly Life in School

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We say to kids, “Here’s your notebook! Now you are writer!” We want kids to write in school and beyond. Maybe there are things we can do in school to keep their writerly lives going–even when our units of study and minilessons have moved on to other aspects of the work.

How to Know When to Move Forward with Language Learners

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I recently was working with a kindergarten teacher who was teaching a group of six kindergarten students, all identified as novice English Language Learners.  My experience observing and working with this group reinforced… Continue reading

IT’S TUESDAY! JOIN US FOR THE SLICE OF LIFE STORY CHALLENGE!

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Welcome! Join today’s Slice of Life Story Challenge by… writing a post, sharing the permalink in the comments section, and visiting at least three other slicers to leave a comment for them.

Intentional Practice In Our Writing Classrooms

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Intentional practice leads to better performance. Writing instruction follows a similar pattern, and by about six weeks into the year, teachers know their students. Just like soccer coaches, teachers can start to develop some responsive instruction, both from the figurative sidelines, as well as through direct instruction.

Questions to Reflect, Expand, and Select

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If we are not intentional, we can easily rush into many teaching points, instead of only one. We can overwhelm ourselves and our students. If we are not careful, we can miss the most important reason we sit with a student―the opportunity to listen and learn.

There Is No Finish Line

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Using student work as feedback for our teaching informs us. It empowers us.  In a way, it allows young writers to become our teachers…

A Parade of Writers

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It’s time to celebrate the progress writers have made!

IT’S TUESDAY! JOIN US FOR THE SLICE OF LIFE STORY CHALLENGE!

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Welcome! Join today’s Slice of Life Story Challenge by writing a post, sharing the permalink in the comments section, and visiting at least three other slicers to leave a comment for them.

A Mentor Text to Inspire the Next Generation of Writers and Activists + a Book Giveaway

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I’ve found a hybrid mentor text that will inspire young writers and budding activists.
Leave a comment on this post for a chance to win a copy of Scot Ritchie’s new book, Join the No-Plastic Challenge.

A Writer’s Mindset–Part Two

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The mindset of our writers has a direct impact on the progress and success of our writers.

How to Name a Transferable Teaching Point in a Writing Conference

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Conferring with young writers is far too complex to boiled down to just one important aspect. But… if you had to name the most important part of a writing conference, what would it be?

Three Ways To Increase Instructional Clarity

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Teaching is an art, and sometimes tweaks don’t work as we hope or envision. However, I hope that these three ideas do increase the clarity of instruction in ways that help all students learn to be independent confident writers.