Monthly Archive: August, 2019

Read Alouds for Writers

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For students, a read aloud is a serious tool. It is a source of building community, language, literacy, and much more. Read alouds offer a lot for the growth of a reader, but… Continue reading

How do your students learn?

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The more that we understand the distinctive characteristics of the intelligences, the better we can recognize ways to differentiate for learners, honoring the spectrum of learning styles that exist in not only our classrooms, but also our world.

Spicing Up Revision

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During the revision phase of the writing process, I find that many writers will often ‘tinker’ rather than really revise for meaning.  Perhaps you’ve see similar behaviors in your middle school writers? Read on to learn a few tips for spicing up revision!

It’s Tuesday! Welcome to the Slice of Life Story Challenge

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It’s Tuesday! Time to write, share and give!

Writers Need Tools!

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As teachers, we have tools we use across the day and toolkits we use within our writing workshop. As I get ready for my second week of school here is a glimpse at the tools my writers will be gathering this week as we get further into the routines of our writing workshop!

Launching Writing Workshop with Passion and Purpose

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What are your hopes for your writers this year and how will you start the year with those hopes in mind? Read on to see my plans for starting writing workshop with passion and purpose.

Inspire Your Young Writers With A Wide Inclusive Range of Topics and Stories

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One thing we can do to support all writers, is to be intentional in the topics and story ideas we use as models and mentors. Modeling a wide range of stories and ideas can help each of your writers be inspired.

How to Deal with “Too Much” Energy in the Classroom + a Book Giveaway

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Every writing workshop I’ve ever taught or consulted in has had at least one child who is in perpetual motion. Many times, that child is the kid who talks their classmates during independent writing time, interrupts their teacher during a writing conference, or cannot respect their peers’ space in the meeting area. The first few weeks of school are the perfect time to begin conversations about living in a classroom community where all learners have different needs.

Susan Verde, author of Unstoppable Me, chats with Stacey about the ways we can build classroom writing communities that welcome kids with who are often seen as having “too much” energy.

It’s Tuesday! Join the Slice of Life Story Challenge

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It’s Tuesday! Time to write, share and give!

English Language Development Frames

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When my sister and I were kids, we played Super Mario Brothers on Nintendo. I witnessed her saving the princess at least three times during our summer video game marathons. I watched as… Continue reading

Growing Writers: Eight Alternatives to Extrinsic Rewards

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“Social psychology has found the more you reward people for doing something, the more they tend to lose interest in whatever they had to do to get the reward.” – Alfie Kohn (2000).… Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Setting Up for Success in the Middle School Writing Workshop

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As each new year approaches, many of us begin thinking about the physical space(s) we create for our writers.  How might it/they be more effective? Inviting? Or different? The spaces we design for our middle school writers can greatly affect how they “view” writing. Check out this week’s Throwback Thursday for ideas on creating space for writing in the middle school writing workshop!

(Writing) Life Imitates Art: Finding Inspiration in Ralph Fletcher’s Instagram

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The creative lives we maintain outside of writing fill us up as humans with stories to tell. When we bring this life into the writing workshop, it builds community, and it lays the foundation for lifelong writers who have strategies for sustaining their own writing lives.

It’s Tuesday! Join the Slice of Life Story Challenge

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It’s Tuesday! Time to write, share and give!

ICYMI: Nurturing Independence From the Start

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Just in case you missed a post, we’ve got all the links in one place! PLUS–The giveaway winners!

The Importance of Repertoire: Nurturing Independence From the Start

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The truth in writing — and in many aspects of life — is that there isn’t really one way to do anything. The strongest writers understand their options and are flexible and intentional with their choices. That’s repertoire!

Writing Because You Want To: Nurturing Independence From the Start

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How do you encourage students to write at home without mandating they do so? Read on for some ideas! Please share your ideas in the comments and keep our conversation going.

A Writer’s Mindset: Nurturing Independence from the Start

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Does the mindset of our student writers impact their independence? How does OUR mindset impact their independence as writers?
After a lot of researching, reading, writing, and reflecting I’m sharing some insights and steps toward building a growth mindset in our classroom communities of writers. Join in the conversation!

When Writers Choose the Genre: Nurturing Independence from the Start

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We don’t just want writers to be independent writers in our classrooms, we want them to be independent writers in the world! To do that, we need to offer frequent opportunities for them to begin with ideas, then choose genre — instead of the other way around.

The Importance of Establishing Routines: Nurturing Independence from the Start

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There are some routines that are more important to teach than others during the first six weeks of school. In the midst of building classroom community and starting to teach curriculum, there are a dozen routines one can model with students so writing workshop runs efficiently.