Monthly Archive: November, 2018

The Idea Book: A Tool To Help Kids Live Like Writers

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It’s never too early to instill writerly habits. A class idea book will inspire kids to collect seeds for writing everywhere they go (and much, much more!).

SOL (and Election) Tuesday

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Somehow, I’m guessing that this community is not one that needs reminders to vote, but maybe we all need inspiration and energy to encourage everyone around us to get to the polls today.… Continue reading

Six Ways to Keep the Energy of Writer’s Notebooks Alive All Year Long

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You spent the first couple months of the school year helping students understand their lives are significant, their stories are worth recording, and their notebooks are the place to make all of that happen. What’s next now that it’s November?

Whose Notebook is it Anyway? Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool

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Encouraging engagement with notebooks means we may need to get out of the way. The notebook should always feel like it belongs to the writer.

Overview: Notebooks as a Writer’s Tool Blog Series

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Though the topic of this series is notebooks, the spotlight of each of our posts shines on writers. Our goal is to foster the kind of writers who, at any age, habitually collect ideas. Writer’s notebooks can most certainly become a powerful tool for this.

Writing on a Snow Day

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Matthew Cordell’s new picture book provides inspiration for kids to CHOOSE to write when they’re snowed-in during the winter. Read through my Q&A with Cordell to start thinking about how you could encourage your students to decide to write when they’re homebound this winter.
After you read the Q&A, leave a comment on this blog post for the chance to win a copy of King Alice.

Writing Conferences: What to Do When a Writer Doesn’t Say Much?

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When conferring with a writer, our big aim is to engage in a meaningful conversation with the student about his or her writing.  An individual writing conference is likely the single most effective way for a teacher to help move a writer forward. But many times, even with our best intentions and attempts at “training” students how to converse during a conference, the student will sometimes say something curt, like, “Good.”  Or, “It’s fine.”  Silence.  That’s it.  That’s all they have to say. What to do?  Fear not!  Conferring Carl suggests six strategies to help teachers address this situation…