Monthly Archive: January, 2016

Writing Tweet Roundup

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Check out Deb’s end-of-the-month curated collection of writing Tweets!

Last Call for the Welcome Wagon!

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Will you help us welcome new Slicers this March?

The Schedule: How Do You Fit It All In?

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In this post, I share several examples of daily schedules, along with links to other resources.

Story: Still the Heart of Literacy Learning

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Take a little tour with me as I share highlights from this new book by Katie Egan Cunningham.

Starting with Story

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I recently had the pleasure of attending the 25th Annual Comprehensive Literacy and Reading Recovery Conference in Illinois.  One of the sessions I attended was led by the brilliant and endearing Christopher Lehman.  His session centered… Continue reading

Join the Fourth Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge!

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This March marks the fourth year of the classroom version of the Slice of Life Story Challenge, or Classroom SOLSC. We hope that many of you will join the challenge with your classes!

SOLS

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Today is Tuesday which means it is time to write your Slice, share your link, and give at least three comments to other bloggers.  Don’t forget to click on some unfamiliar names in the… Continue reading

Join Our Writing Community!

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Calling all educators! Whether you’re thinking about joining our writing community or coming back for your ninth March writing challenge, please take a few minutes to read this post. (NOTE: There’s a change about who can participate in the individual challenge this year.)

Should Educators Be Writers?

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Is it important that teachers who teach writing actually write?

Dialogue in First Grade

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See how these first graders added dialogue to their narrative writing.

Student Writing Reflection

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Young learners are fascinating. One minute they’re focused and willing workers, seconds later they’re playful and silly, but watch them with their parents and they become entirely different little people, and I am reminded of how young they are. It’s for this exact reason I love working with our youngest learners. Their playful, innocent nature alongside the desire to be a “big kid” suits our job perfectly.

Three Quick Tips for Small Group Strategy Lessons

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Have you been super busy the past few weeks? I know I sure have been! So, I won’t take up any extra of your time. Here are three quick tips for small group… Continue reading

What Does it All Mean? Really?

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Sometimes the place we land isn’t where we belong, it is merely a place to pause before the real destination.

Write, Share, Give – SOLS Tuesday

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It’s Tuesday which means it is time to write your Slice, share your link, and give at least three comments to other Slicers. I know so many of us have formed friendships through… Continue reading

Putting the Exploratory Notebook into practice…with thanks to Ralph Fletcher

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Putting the Exploratory Notebook into practice…

Call For Volunteers: Will You Help?

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The ninth annual March Slice of Life Story Challenge is just around the corner! Consider joining the team to gear up for the challenge that stretches the writers inside all of us. This… Continue reading

Sometimes It’s Actually Not a Choice: Accountability in the Writing Workshop

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My goal for the next few weeks is to pay close attention to kids when they leave the meeting area to start working. How many are actually trying out the new strategy? How many are going right back to their old habits? And what can I do to coach them to try new things?

Comments Make Community!

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Comments are at the heart of blogging!

I’m Trying to Love Spiders: A Review & Giveaway

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When my principal handed me a copy of Bethany Barton’s I’m Trying to Love Spiders, I was intrigued.  She had chosen this book as our Everybody Reads title for the month and I was… Continue reading

Daring To Lift Student Learning- Choice in Writing Tools

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Teaching well demands we stay current and try new ideas. There isn’t any insurance policy that the newest strategy, book, program, or app will work for all or anyone, but we trust our education and experience, and we do what we know to be best for kids. Brené Brown in Daring Greatly says,

Risk aversion kills innovation~ Berné Brown Daring Greatly
So embrace the mess, the awkwardness, and all the uncertainties rattling in your mind and do what you trust to be best for the students in your classroom.